Google Analytics for intermediates: using goals

Google Analytics for intermediates: using goals

After last week’s blog post about Google Analytics, we will continue with this subject in this blog. You have been introduced to Analytics, placed the code and visitors are being counted – you seem to be ready to monitor everything. But, especially for your web shop, Analytics has so much more to offer: today we are looking at using goals.

Having a summary of all the stats is a good start, and then we will look into what really matters when owning a web shop: conversion. Meaning, in this case, the orders that are being generated through the web shop – Analytics is a good tool to measure these and to see where they came from.

Which goals?

As mentioned before, the main thing is to measure your online orders, these are conversions. Of course Analytics can also measure a lot of other conversions that are interesting when you own a web shop.

  • Contact: when someone contacts you this is, in most cases, because they want more information about a product, during this conversation you can try to sell a product. So filling out a contact form would also be a good conversion.
  • E-mail: do you sent out an e-mail newsletter? Registering for the newsletter can be a good conversion as well.
  • Social media: a new follower on Twitter or a new Facebook like, they widen your range.
  • Etc.: everything that contributes to a better result, you can set as being a conversion, research which ones might be helpful to you.

Set goals

The next step is to set some goals. Within Google Analytics there are 4 different types of goals that you can set;

  • Destination: the visitor ends up on a certain page, for example the “thank you” page. This is the most commonly used in web shops.
  • Duration: the visitor spends a certain amount of time on the website and is therefore marked as a goal.
  • Pages per visit: the visitor looks at a certain number of pages and is therefore marked as a goal.
  • Event: a certain action creates a reaction, in the web shop or on an external site. For example, so a Facebook like can be a goal.

To start setting goals click on ‘admin’, choose your profile (only if you have multiple profiles), and click ‘goals’.

You will see the steps as per below. As a name you can, for example, chose order, make sure it is marked as ‘active’, and choose ‘destination’ as the goal type.

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The ‘goal url’ is very important: this is where you put the thank you page of your web shop so Analytics knows that, visitors that end up on this, have placed an order.

The ‘goal value’ field can be used to set the value of the conversion. In this case this would be 1 because it measures simply 1 order. Note: If you are using e-commerce tracking, you should leave this empty – we will look into this further in our next blog!

Optimize Goals

Now that we have set the goal, you can monitor the results of your web shop. Google Analytics is now not only giving you information about your visitors, but also about the orders that are being placed in your web shop. The next step could be to improve the statistics of the conversion: if the conversion is very low (less than 1% for example), it would be a good idea to improve your product texts, add more photos, simplify the navigation and so on.

E-commerce goals

To further utilize the possibilities of goals in Google Analytics, you could use e-commerce tracking. This allows you to see what a visitor has ordered in detail, and what made him buy the product. More about this in the next blog!

Title Google Analytics for intermediates: using goals Discription You have been introduced to Analytics, placed the code and visitors are being counted – you seem to be ready to monitor everything. But, especially for your web shop, Analytics has so much more to offer: today we are looking at using goals. Keywords Google Analytics, goals, set, e-commerce